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Puerto Vallarta News NetworkNews Around the Republic of Mexico | November 2007 

Calderon Says 'Culture Of Machismo' Still Strong
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There have been advances but ... there is much to be done.
- President Felipe Calderon
Mexico City - President Felipe Calderon said Monday said that despite the passage of anti-discrimination laws, millions of women suffer from workplace bias and physical and psychological abuse due to an enduring "culture of machismo" in Mexico.

"As a citizen, as a husband, as a father, as president, I am worried and indignant over the mistreatment millions of Mexican women still receive," Calderon said during an event on the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women.

Last year alone, the president said, more than 30 million Mexican women suffered some type of violence, while more than 80 percent of women who were murdered were killed in their own homes.

Earlier this year, Mexico enacted a law obligating federal and local authorities to prevent, punish and eradicate violence against women. Yet only a handful of states have formally adopted it, Calderon said.

At fault? A culture still dominated by "the false premise of subordination, submission and even inferiority of women with respect to men," he said. "This is a cultural obstacle that we have to reverse."

Mexico has had some success chipping away at machismo, passing the anti-violence measure and a law allowing same-sex civil unions in Mexico City. Women have also made advances in business and politics, and on Monday, Calderon signed a law aimed at fighting the trafficking and enslavement of women and children.

But he acknowledged the country has a ways to go, saying, "There have been advances but ... there is much to be done."



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